We we can learn from deck screws about conformity and diversity

We we can learn from deck screws about conformity and diversity

I was working on a footbridge and I thought, “I wouldn’t be able to drill in this deck screw if all the different parts weren’t fulfilling their nature- if the screw wanted to be the drill etc. – but I also wouldn’t be able to do it if all the different parts weren’t in line with one another- and if the different parts aren’t in line, then it doesn’t matter how powerful the drill is, in fact the more power, the more everything needs to be in line!

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What we can learn about conformity and diversity from deck screws

I was working on a footbridge and I thought, “I wouldn’t be able to drill in this deck screw if all the different parts weren’t fulfilling their nature- if the screw wanted to be the drill etc. – but I also wouldn’t be able to do it if all the different parts weren’t in line with one another- and if the different parts aren’t in line, then it doesn’t matter how powerful the drill is, in fact the more power, the more everything needs to be in line!

It’s wrong that Ontarians have to pay so much more for a cheap beer

The great Canadian beer smuggler has shone a spotlight on something rotten with beer in Canada, everywhere except for Quebec. You would think that with all the smugness about Canada being more egalitarian than the states and how we like beer so much that in most provinces we wouldn’t make it so much harder for a man with modest means to afford a beer at the end of his shift. Alas, it costs two to three times more for an Ontarian to buy a cheap beer at the end of a shift than his Quebecer or American neighbour, and what’s even more regrettable is that a wealthy Ontarian doesn’t need to spend more (and sometimes even spends much less) than a wealthy American or Quebecer for his fine craft beers- cheap beer is way more affordable in the states and Quebec but high end beer is the same price or more. That would be like distorting the market prices so that a Cadillac is only a little more than a Chevy- people on really tight budgets will have to settle for the Chevy and pay a lot more than it’s worth, while people with discretionary income can buy the Cadillac at close to the same price. It’s ridiculous that in Ontario a Molson Canadian costs almost as much as a fine abbey ale.

The upshot is that we’re putting more of the burden on the Everyman. I personally feel that cheap beer and fine craft beer both have their time and place, and I enjoy them both very much. I maintain, though, we should be taxing luxury items more than the small reward at the end of a long day for hard working people. It’s a shame our craven political establishment would rather build more casinos and overtax things wealthy people don’t consume, like cheap beer and cigarettes, while also doing things like cutting taxes for people in the ‘middle class’ who make 200 grand a year and subsidizing luxury electric cars.

I just think beer is good place to start closing that gap between our ideals and the way we’re running things. I think beer should be cheaper, but if it must be taxed so much at least make the wealthy pay the same proportionately for their tastes. Let’s make it easier for everyone to have holiday cheer throughout the year.

(The same pricing situation between the states and Canada holds for spirits; however, I don’t think cheap spirits should be more affordable- please look to Hogarth’s juxtaposition of beer street and gin lane to illustrate the basis for that opinion- so why can’t the rest of Canada be like Quebec and make cheap beer more affordable while keeping prices high on spirits and fine beer?)

I’ve read several reviews on Mudbound and I have something to add

I’ve read several reviews and I won’t try to express what these reviewers have already expressed eloquently and powerfully.

Still, I will add something that the major reviews I’ve read have overlooked. The great hope in the end of the movie is acknowledgment of fatherhood. This is the power of the movie: that we need to take responsibility and atone for our sins is critical (and movingly conveyed throughout the movie), but the vital ending shows us how so many of us, through a lack of courage or lack of true self esteem, also aren’t able to take responsibility for the beauty we’re a part of- further, when innocence is lost and evil has stolen your voice, it is that beauty that will speak for itself, if only we are, like Ronsel, faithful enough to acknowledge it!